The Fighting Rooms /// 

 

The programmatic needs of a building are usually determined without full consideration of site, zoning, or budgetary constraints. Inevitably, the dimensions of building plans are reduced, pushing rooms against one another and into competition for space. Even after the design is complete and the building is constructed, the friction between rooms rarely subsides. Shifting users, priorities, and technologies apply constant pressures on walls that define rooms. The expansion of one room means the reduction or complete removal of another. How might an architectural framework highlight and respond to programmatic pressures in real-time? What happens when rooms fight each other?

 

Participants are asked to consider designs that are not simply flexible, but that express programmatic pressures. Submissions may be technical, conceptual, practical, and/or artistic.

JURORS ///

 

Melissa Bernstein, AIA

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

B.Arch, Temple University

Firm: Jacobs

 

Emma P. Castro

Kansas City, Missouri, United States

B.Arch, Temple University

Firm: Populous

 

Ryan Edwards 

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

M.Arch, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Firm: Helicon Design Group

 

 

RESULTS ///

 

Alfredo Di Zenzo & Daniel Felix

Florence, Italy & Guimarães, Portugal

 

Julie Tadros

London, United Kingdom

 

Neeraj Chatterji

Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

 

Parisa Mansourian

New York, New York, United States

 

John Yoo

Seoul, South Korea

 

Ömer Kaya

Jersey City, New Jersey

 

Shui Cheung, Hui

London, United Kingdom.

ENTRIES ///

 

ENTRIES

 

 

Africa

 

Asia

 

Europe

 

N. America

 

S. America

 

Oceana

Alfredo Di Zenzo & Daniel Felix

Florence, Italy & Guimarães, Portugal

 

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This entry's idea of inflating or deflating programmatic pressures is thoughtful and successful in its solution to the requirements of the brief. One is left wanting to know how the idea of inflating/deflating program would resolve itself architecturally."

 

"This option shows the flexibility of use in different size spaces. It speaks to what size room is most appropriate for the user. One person may prefer the bedroom to be in the largest room, while another user may prefer the living room to be in the largest room."

 

 

 

Julie Tadros

London, United Kingdom

 

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"Like ripples on a pond from even the lightest of leaves, the simplicity and subtlety with which this entry conveys the idea of programmatic pressures is impressive and beautifully executed."

 

"While this design is only a simple grid system, the idea to trim and delete walls in a concentric circle is creative on its own. The creation of the new space is only possible with the already flexible design, where no wall is a permanent element or a necessity."

Neeraj Chatterji

Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

 

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"Although many entries tended towards what one might call the "Tetris approach," this entry, to me, most successfully conveys a sense of a continuously flowing (bordering on never ending) series of programs or spatial requirements that have to be resolved as a means of retaining the cohesive whole that is architecture."

Parisa Mansourian

New York, New York, United States

 

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This graphic shows different functional uses that may be found in a dense city apartment or loft building. The variety of activities exemplifies how to best use a space to your personal needs, and is graphically entertaining. The complementary colors are a pleasant choice, as well."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Yoo

Seoul, South Korea

 

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This option shows modularity of whole rooms vs. modularity of individual walls. With simple colors contrasting the white, the graphic is clear. If one rearranges odd shaped rooms, it will always leave space to create more odd shaped rooms. There is consistency in the chaos."

Ömer Kaya

Ankara, Turkey

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"The idea of walls that fight for their place in a space is fascinating. It almost leaves the space hierarchy to take control over the final product. If it matters, then it stays but, if it isn't crucial, then it goes away."

 

Shui Cheung, Hui

London, United Kingdom

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This is a good example of how different modular units fit together in an infinite number of ways. They vary in size and shape, but ultimately they are part of the common system and design intent of a Mondrian backdrop."

 

Carlos Cutting

Dallas, Texas, United States

Dammy Lee

New York, New York, United States

 

JT Bachman

Brooklyn, New York, United States

 

Ambarus Razvan-Marian

Husi , Vaslui County, Romania

 

Nevis Isaj

Champaign, Illinois, United States

 

Levi Bedall

Columbus, Ohio, United States

 

Jakob Vermelin

Lund, Skåne, Sweden