The Tired Column ///

 

Columns are designed to have the appearance of stability. It is reassuring to consider that the element holding objects aloft is stoic and permanent. On the surface a column might seem static, but it is constantly reacting to dynamic forces, including live loads, wind gusts, seismic events, and temperature fluctuations. What if, under such stresses, a column began to falter and bend? How might it reflect the external forces imposed upon it? How might it degrade, sink, or buckle in reaction to events around it? What happens when a column gets tired?

 

Participants are asked to design a structure that does not harm its inhabitants while failing or degrading. Submissions may be technical, conceptual, practical, and/or artistic.

 

JURORS ///

 

Chris Dove

Liverpool, United Kingdom

PG DipArch, Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art

 

Nicholas D. Paley

Manchester, Cheshire, United Kingdom

B.Arch, Lincoln University

Firm: Unknown Studio

 

Conor Roche

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

BS.Arch, Temple University

Firm: Con Roche Construction

 

RESULTS ///

 

Alex Willms

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

 

Kyle Faulkner

Rockford, Illinois, United States

 

Ornella Clappier

Vienna, Austria

 

Adam Hills

London, United Kingdom

 

Curtis Wayland

Arlington, Texas, United States

 

Joseph Meucci

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

 

Anna A Misharina

Izhevsk, Russia

ENTRIES ///

 

ENTRIES

 

 

 

Africa

 

Asia

 

Europe

 

N. America

 

S. America

 

Oceana

Alex Willms

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

 

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This entry describes the translation of forces on the column to the formal and spatial properties of the environment. I think its an excellent response to the brief from an architectural design perspective. I like to imagine the spatial change within a building that could incorporate this system."

 

"I really like the idea of G. The idea that a column might contract or retract depending on the different, variable loads exerted on it would really give the inhabitant a knowledge of how the building works. If several were used throughout the same structure, a knowledge would be passed on, illustrating physically the forces exerted through different points of the architecture, instead of this phenomenon happening where we cannot see or understand it. The entry is also well illustrated, explaining the idea in diagram form, without relying on text to do the explaining, which is something incredibly important to architects and designers."

 

"This entry shows key understanding of the brief, and is presented elegantly in terms of presentation. Technically inventive in terms of changing forces and loads, elegant in its material restraint. Translation of ‘dynamic force’ into a design for a column that creates dynamic floor spaces below: this is an architectural answer."

Kyle Faulkner

Rockford, Illinois, United States

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"I like how this entry implies that a column has a metabolism, reacting to the stresses of daily life until it ages beyond its capacity to function."

 

"K is an entry that has clearly undergone some interesting thought of the world we live in. Comparing a building to the world we inhabit, and to human beings as columns is an apt look at the way our society works, and in the constant life cycle of growing old and being replaced. Although not completely architectural, this idea brings to light an issue of how we treat our buildings and maybe even our people as disposable elements of a greater object."

Ornella Clappier

Vienna, Austria

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"I enjoy the ambition and scale of D. The idea that buildings and the city can be changed constantly, through the use of moving parts and technology is something that causes an interesting discussion for the future of our cities. The idea reminds me of the ethics of the Metabolist movement of Japan led by Kenzo Tange, who dreamt of new, large scale ideas of how the city may act, change, grow and even die."

Joseph Meucci

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Curtis Wayland

Arlington, Texas, United States

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"It is great to see an entry addressing the unseen structures that are holding up our societies and our way of life. That data could be seen as a physical mass is neither here nor there, yet the idea that masses of digital information can both support and weigh us down is clever. Just think what Google's server buildings would look like!"

 

 

 

 

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This entry works well in describing physical and formal change due to load and stress. It gives a good sense of how materials react under pressure and provides a tangible base for design."

 

 

Adam Hills

London, United Kingdom

Anna A. Misharina

Izhevsk, Russia

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"To think of human beings as being the columns supporting loading social and political tiers is thought provoking. The way a column holds it’s load could provide us metaphor as to how we all support the loads that bare down on us from day to day. What strength and appearance would a column made from an army or work force have compared to kings and queens? Who holds who and what?"hing like this?"

 

 

EDITOR'S CHOICE ///

 

Editor's Choice is given periodically to an entry that deserves recognition, but that was not voted on by the jury.

 

"I rather think the world is like sand. The fundamental nature of sand is very difficult to grasp when you think of it in its stationary state. Sand not only flows, but this very flow is the sand.” Kōbō Abe

Kim de Regt

Amsterdam, Holland

Fala Atelier (Filipe Magalhães & Ana Luisa Soares)

Oporto, Portugal

Halima Arevalo

Arlington, Texas, United States

Lana Shihabeddin

Fort Worth, Texas, United States

David Pacheco Garcia

Fort Worth, Texas, United States

Roque Orellana

Arlington, Texas, United States

Halima Arevalo

Arlington, Texas, United States

Agnieszka Ufnal

Bialystok, Poland

Saul Olmedo

Arlington, Texas, United States

Logan Axelson

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Melissa Chin

Paris, France

Roque Orellana

Arlington, Texas, United States

Aaron Lim Ee Zhen

Perth, Australia

Wesley Verhoeven

Lisse, Zuid-Holland, The Netherlands

Halima Arevalo

Arlington, Texas, United States

Carlos Cutting

Dallas, Texas, United States

Richard Manoharan

Mysore, Karnataka, India

Lucas Da Cruz

Garland, Texas, United States

Lucy Brown

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Gerardo Cisneros Dallas

Texas United States

Carlos Cutting

Dallas, Texas, United States

Lucas Da Cruz

Garland, Texas, United States

Carlos Cutting

Dallas, Texas, United States

Ninad Sadanand Warghade

Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Sadman Zaki Ahmed

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Carolina Zuniga

Arlington, Texas, United States

Roque Orellana

Arlington, Texas, United States

Dhaval Ashok Darjee

Umbergaon, Gujurat, India

Ganesan Muniyandi

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Carolina Zuniga

Arlington, Texas, United States

Ulises Reyes

Arlington, Texas, United States

Christopher Laskoski

Fort Worth, Texas, United States of America

Adrian de Leon

Arlington, Texas, United States

Curtis Wayland

Arlington, Texas, United States