JULY 2016 COMPETITION

 

The Fragile Pattern ///

 

Patterns are composed of repeating elements: color, form, space, light, events, etc. However, patterns themselves are essentially mental constructs, which rely on an applied set of rules. After establishing a pattern concept it is not uncommon to find flaws, inconsistencies, and complexities upon closer inspection. The original pattern unravels and is either replaced by a more nuanced pattern or it is dissolved completely. How must a pattern be regarded differently when it is known that it will eventually fall apart? What practical purpose might a temporary or shifting pattern have? How might a pattern be deconstructed through technical, environmental, or social means? What happens when a pattern becomes fragile?

 

Participants are asked to consider a wide range of pattern types beyond graphic patterns. Submissions may be conceptual, technical, and/or artistic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESULTS ///

Top 8

Tolga Hazan

Ankara, Turkey

Garrett Rodriguez

Arlington, Texas, United States

James Heusser

Lisbon, Portugal

Stewart Lore

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 

Andy Sniderman

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States 

Jake Rosenwald

New York, New York, United States

Charbel Jabbour

Strasbourg, France

JURORS ///

 

 Ian Sauls

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
B.Arch, Temple University
Firm: ALMA architecture

Melissa Chapman-Smith

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
M.Arch, Barcelona Institute of Architecture (BIARCH)
Firm: Coscia Moos Architecture

Alison Vu

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

BS in Textile Design, Philadelphia University 

 

 

ENTRIES ///

 

46 Entries

Tara Chand Jangid

Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

Editor's Choice

Irin Siriwattanagul

Berlin, Germany

Tolga Hazan

Ankara, Turkey

(UU)

JURY COMMENTS ///

"This nuanced submission criticizes patterns in our food and forestry industries. Economic and cultural norms dictate land use, turning forests into factory farms. The pop icon consuming the landscape represents our fragile ecological, production, and distribution systems."

"Interesting connection between forms and truths. Represented by circles, the producer and consumer fit snugly within the grid of our economy.  Their power struggle is responsible for cultural patterns in our capitalist society."

Garrett Rodriguez

Arlington, Texas, United States

(C)

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This is a good example of how our brains can recognize patterns in complex images. Depending on how you look at it, you can see order or chaos. The use of scale, layering, repeated elements, and both ordered and disordered lines are effective in conveying this concept."

 

(GG)

James Heusser

Lisbon, Portugal

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"This palimpsest of patterned motifs speaks to the instability of fashion. Stylized paper covers the old and lends its own admission of temporality. The submission exposes layers of time and taste, revealing the fragility that is accommodated by intricate and bold patterns."

 

Stewart Lore

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

(W)

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"I love how this submission balances architecture and scientific observation to present event-type patterns of the occupants lives. It's fun comparing the balconies' programs and I'm curious as to how this glimpse would look on an hourly/weekly/ annual basis."

 

(I)

Andy Sniderman

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"The repetition on the left half serves as my clarity by giving me a comparison to the numerical and deconstructive translations on the right half. I love how the canvas's edge becomes an interruption: it allows the patterns to continue endlessly and also solidifies them into a sphere."

 

(HH)

Jake Rosenwald

New York, New York, United States

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"At first glance, this seems to be a black circle made up of dots, surrounded by a ring of blue and purple dots, surrounded by spaced out yellow dots.  As you stare at it, you realize just how imperfect the layout is, and how much variation there is in the color of the dots.  This is a good example of how our brains simplify information into patterns, and it also shows how a varied, textured, imperfect design may actually be more interesting."

 

Charbel Jabbour

Strasbourg, France

(QQ)

JURY COMMENTS ///

"Utilizing a biological metaphor, this submission correlates patterns of urbanization to concepts of work and community. The grid is presented as a banal vessel for production, populated by worker bees. Furthermore, the seeming disorientation of the bees (and absence of honey) points to the possibility of Colony Collapse Disorder, which applied to the urban metaphor suggests a despondent future."

Tara Chand Jangid

Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

(A)

JURY COMMENTS ///

 

"The caption clearly and concisely conveys the concept of a pattern that changes throughout the day, but may repeat each day. The graphic clearly illustrates a shadow pattern that may exist at one point on any given day."

 

Irin Siriwattanagul

Berlin, Germany

EDITOR COMMENTS ///

 

"This entry beautifully represents a large data set from an unknown source. There is a level of complexity in the three-dimensional cartesian that is both captivating and overwhelming. Do systems of representation have built in flaws that create patterns that do not exist? This entry underscores the idea that processing information can both reveal and obscures source material." 

Yahya Shaker

Cairo, Egypt​

Atabong Fonkeng

Arlington, Texas, United States

Razvan-Marian Ambarus

Bucharest, Romania

Komal Nandanwar

Arlington, Texas, United States

Yifan Gu

Arlington, Texas, United States

Catherine Varnas

Oak Park, Illinois, United States

Natasha A. Trice

New York, New York, United States

Joel Martinez

Dallas, Texas, United States

Ailín Ó Cuinneáin

Westport, County Mayo, Ireland

Daniela Cantu

Corpus Christi, Texas, United States

O

Manoj Singh

Pune, Maharashtra, India

Dominika Strzałka

Cracow, Poland

Joseph Boring

Arlington, Texas, United States

Jonathan Brown

Dallas, Texas, United States

Ali Adib Sereshki

Tehran, Iran

Joel Martinez

Dallas, Texas, United States

Garrett Rodriguez

Arlington, Texas, United States

Dominika Strzałka

Cracow, Poland

Mahima Kumari

Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Matthew Carney

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Sarah Inassari Santoso

Surabaya, Indonesia

George Wu

Arlington, Texas, United States

Nivedhitha Mathan Kumar

Chennai, Tamilnadu, India

Kate Beckham

London, United Kingdom

Manuel A. Serrato

Arlington, Texas, United States

Yimeng Teng

Charlottesville, Virginia, United States

Kalaivanan

Chennai, Tamilnadu, India

Rafee Dellpak

Tehran, Iran

Nicholas Reddon

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Ryuta Kure

Omaha, Nebraska, United States

Alexandra Dima

Thessaloniki, Greece

Chelsi Sanchez

Manila, Philippines

Natacha Schnider

Los Angeles, California, United States

Bryant Lau Liang Cheng

Singapore

Halima Khatun

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Dominika Strzałka

Cracow, Poland

Efren Estrada

Arlington, Texas, United States

Denis Serebrennikov

Vinnitsa, Ukraine